In review: Miss Hope Springs at Wigmore Hall

In review: Miss Hope Springs at Wigmore Hall

The audience tittered, shuffling in their seats as the lights came down in Wigmore Hall late last night. Before the stage door had opened there was already a sense of community among these bums-in-seats, familiar faces greeting each other like long time friends, and strangers being welcomed into what was surely going to be a night to remember. Although I was seated alone in a row by myself, I received so many warm smiles from people whom I had never met.

And then the force of a goddess walked through the door onto the stage. The crowd erupted, and the presence of Miss Hope Springs became the only thing in the room. Miss Hope Springs has the ability to control an entire audience with just one turn of her head, and as she walked on the stage it was clear how she had honed this power over the many years of her career (Miss Hope Springs told us she had just celebrated her 39th birthday).

It's difficult to come up with any artists who have recently graced Wigmore Hall who have that same power - whose mere entrance can rile up a crowd, who doesn't even have to play a note to have us on the edge of our seats. This is the kind of magical ability that classical performers should be trying to discover.

During the cabaret-style performance, Miss Hope Springs told the story of her career, from being an ex-showgirl in Las Vegas to meeting Noel Coward across the pond, while weaving her original songs throughout her witty banter. We particularly loved joining in her rousing chorus of "It's a Love Song," and the classic wit that inspired the title track of her new album, "The Devil Made me do it."

At the length of just one hour, Miss Hope Springs had us imploring her for more. Indeed, we could have listened to her monologue all night - with some technical mishaps leading to lightening-fast comebacks, her improvisational speech had us feeling like she was a dear friend of ours.

Miss Hope Springs is currently on tour in the U.K., going to such glamorous places as Deal and Milton Keynes before she returns to London in July. Go see her for a remarkable experience - you truly won't regret it.

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Written by

John Beckett

John Beckett

John Beckett is a writer, opera repetiteur and vocal coach currently residing in London, UK. With dreams of becoming a concert pianist, he quickly switched track to playing for singers after seeing how less notes are in accompaniment parts than in solo music. In spite of this, his favorite art song is "Apparition" by Debussy.

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